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|after = [[My Crush]]
 
|after = [[My Crush]]
 
|video = [[File:bad romANTs - Minibyte - A.N.T. Farm - Disney Channel Official|200px]]}}
 
|video = [[File:bad romANTs - Minibyte - A.N.T. Farm - Disney Channel Official|200px]]}}
'''''Gibson Go Away''''' is a song [[Chyna Parks|Chyna]] shared with [[Fletcher]] in the episode "[[bad romANTs]]" to try and think of ways to get rid of [[Gibson]], who had been hanging out with them way too much and was getting on their nerves.
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'''''G'''''
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Abraham Lincoln Online Speeches and Writings
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Home | News | Books | Speeches | Places | Resources | Education | Timelines | Index | Search
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 Photograph of the Gettysburg National Cemetery
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Soldiers National Cemetery
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© Abraham Lincoln Online
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The Gettysburg Address
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Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
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November 19, 1863
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On June 1, 1865, Senator Charles Sumner referred to the most famous speech ever given by President Abraham Lincoln. In his eulogy on the slain president, he called the Gettysburg Address a "monumental act." He said Lincoln was mistaken that "the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here." Rather, the Bostonian remarked, "The world noted at once what he said, and will never cease to remember it. The battle itself was less important than the speech."
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There are five known copies of the speech in Lincoln's handwriting, each with a slightly different text, and named for the people who first received them: Nicolay, Hay, Everett, Bancroft and Bliss. Two copies apparently were written before delivering the speech, one of which probably was the reading copy. The remaining ones were produced months later for soldier benefit events. Despite widely-circulated stories to the contrary, the president did not dash off a copy aboard a train to Gettysburg. Lincoln carefully prepared his major speeches in advance; his steady, even script in every manuscript is consistent with a firm writing surface, not the notoriously bumpy Civil War-era trains. Additional versions of the speech appeared in newspapers of the era, feeding modern-day confusion about the authoritative text.
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Bliss Copy
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Ever since Lincoln wrote it in 1864, this version has been the most often reproduced, notably on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. It is named after Colonel Alexander Bliss, stepson of historian George Bancroft. Bancroft asked President Lincoln for a copy to use as a fundraiser for soldiers (see "Bancroft Copy" below). However, because Lincoln wrote on both sides of the paper, the speech could not be reprinted, so Lincoln made another copy at Bliss's request. It is the last known copy written by Lincoln and the only one signed and dated by him. Today it is on display at the Lincoln Room of the White House.
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Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
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Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
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But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
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Abraham Lincoln
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November 19, 1863
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Nicolay Copy
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Named for John G. Nicolay, President Lincoln's personal secretary, this is considered the "first draft" of the speech, begun in Washington on White house stationery. The second page is writen on different paper stock, indicating it was finished in Gettysburg before the cemetery dedication began. Lincoln gave this draft to Nicolay, who went to Gettysburg with Lincoln and witnessed the speech. The Library of Congress owns this manuscript.
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Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
  +
  +
  +
  +
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do.
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But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate we can not consecrate we can not hallow, this ground The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.
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It is rather for us, the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us that, from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here, gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve these dead shall not have died in vain; that the nation, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
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Hay Copy
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Believed to be the second draft of the speech, President Lincoln gave this copy to John Hay, a White House assistant. Hay accompanied Lincoln to Gettysburg and briefly referred to the speech in his diary: "the President, in a fine, free way, with more grace than is his wont, said his half dozen words of consecration." The Hay copy, which includes Lincoln's handwritten changes, also is owned by the Library of Congress.
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Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
  +
  +
  +
  +
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met here on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
  +
  +
  +
  +
But in a larger sense, we can not dedicate we can not consecrate we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here, but can never forget what they did here.
  +
  +
  +
  +
It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they have, thus far, so nobly carried on. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
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Everett Copy
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Edward Everett, the chief speaker at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication, clearly admired Lincoln's remarks and wrote to him the next day saying, "I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes." In 1864 Everett asked Lincoln for a copy of the speech to benefit Union soldiers, making it the third manuscript copy. Eventually the state of Illinois acquired it, where it's preserved at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.
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  +
  +
  +
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
  +
  +
  +
  +
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives, that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
  +
  +
  +
  +
But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.
  +
  +
  +
  +
It is for us, the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here, have, thus far, so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
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Bancroft Copy
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As noted above, historian George Bancroft asked President Lincoln for a copy to use as a fundraiser for soldiers. When Lincoln sent his copy on February 29, 1864, he used both sides of the paper, rendering the manuscript useless for lithographic engraving. So Bancroft kept this copy and Lincoln had to produce an additional one (Bliss Copy). The Bancroft copy is now owned by Cornell University.
  +
  +
  +
  +
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
  +
  +
  +
  +
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives, that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
  +
  +
  +
  +
But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion - that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
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Source for all versions: Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, edited by Roy P. Basler and others.
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Related Links
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A Teacher's Tour of the Battle of Gettysburg (Matthew Pinsker/Gilder Lehrman Institute)
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Battlefield Maps (Library of Congress)
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Civil War Institute (Gettysburg College)
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Edward Everett's Gettysburg Speech (University of Maryland)
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Gettysburg Address Exhibit (Library of Congress)
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Gettysburg Address Eyewitness (National Public Radio)
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Gettysburg Address News Article (New York Times)
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Gettysburg Address Teacher Resource (C-SPAN)
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Gettysburg Address Text
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Gettysburg Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress)
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Gettysburg Discussion Group (Bob & Dennis Lawrence)
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  +
Gettysburg Foundation
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Gettysburg National Military Park (NPS)
  +
  +
How Some Few "Remarks" Became the Gettysburg Address (LAP/ALI)
  +
  +
David Wills's Letter of Invitation to Lincoln (Library of Congress)
  +
  +
Lincoln and the Gettysburg Awakening (JALA)
  +
  +
Lincoln and Gettysburg Timeline
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  +
Lincoln Fellowship of Pennsylvania
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Lincoln's Invitation to Stay Overnight (Library of Congress)
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  +
Edward Everett's Letter to Lincoln (Library of Congress)
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  +
Photograph of Lincoln at Gettysburg (Library of Congress)
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  +
Reading of the Gettysburg Address (NPR)
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  +
Recollections of Lincoln at Gettysburg (Bob Cooke)
  +
  +
Response to a Serenade
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  +
Robert Todd Lincoln's "Gettysburg Story" (JALA)
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  +
Seminary Ridge Museum
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  +
Solving the Mysteries of the Gettysburg Address (LAP/ALI)
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The Gettysburg Powerpoint Presentation (Peter Norvig)
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Who Stole the Gettysburg Address? (JALA)
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Wills House
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Related Books
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  +
  +
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Boritt, Gabor. The Gettysburg Gospel: The Lincoln Speech That Nobody Knows. Simon & Schuster, 2006.
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Graham, Kent. November: Lincoln's Elegy at Gettysburg. Indiana University Press, 2001.
  +
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Hoch, Bradley R. and Boritt, Gabor S. The Lincoln Trail in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania State University Press, 2001.
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Johnson, Martin P. Writing the Gettysburg Address. University Press of Kansas, 2013.
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Kunhardt, Philip B., Jr. A New Birth of Freedom - Lincoln at Gettysburg. Boston: Little, Brown, 1983.
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Mearns, David C., Dunlap, Lloyd A., Wilson, Douglas L., and Sellers, John R., contributors. Long Remembered: Lincoln and His Five Versions of the Gettysburg Address. Levenger Press, 2011.
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Wills, Garry. Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America. Touchstone Books, 1993.
  +
  +
Wilson, Douglas L. Lincoln's Sword: The Presidency and the Power of Words. Alfred A. Knopf, 2006
  +
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Home | News | Education | Timelines | Places | Resources | Books | Speeches | Index | Search
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Lincoln speech text is in the public domain; the organization, remaining text, and photo on this page are copyright 2018 Abraham Lincoln Online. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy'''''ibson Go Away''''' is a song [[Chyna Parks|Chyna]] shared with [[Fletcher]] in the episode "[[bad romANTs]]" to try and think of ways to get rid of [[Gibson]], who had been hanging out with them way too much and was getting on their nerves.
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==Lyrics:==
 
==Lyrics:==
 
Our friend Gibson was feeling down,<br />
 
Our friend Gibson was feeling down,<br />

Revision as of 03:47, April 6, 2018

"Gibson Go Away"
Song by China Anne McClain
Genre(s): Acoustic
Length: 0:55
A.N.T. Farm chronology
Previous: "Olive's Rap"
Next: "My Crush"
Video
Bad romANTs - Minibyte - A.N.T

Bad romANTs - Minibyte - A.N.T. Farm - Disney Channel Official

G


Abraham Lincoln Online Speeches and Writings

Home | News | Books | Speeches | Places | Resources | Education | Timelines | Index | Search

 Photograph of the Gettysburg National Cemetery

Soldiers National Cemetery

© Abraham Lincoln Online

The Gettysburg Address

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

November 19, 1863

On June 1, 1865, Senator Charles Sumner referred to the most famous speech ever given by President Abraham Lincoln. In his eulogy on the slain president, he called the Gettysburg Address a "monumental act." He said Lincoln was mistaken that "the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here." Rather, the Bostonian remarked, "The world noted at once what he said, and will never cease to remember it. The battle itself was less important than the speech."


There are five known copies of the speech in Lincoln's handwriting, each with a slightly different text, and named for the people who first received them: Nicolay, Hay, Everett, Bancroft and Bliss. Two copies apparently were written before delivering the speech, one of which probably was the reading copy. The remaining ones were produced months later for soldier benefit events. Despite widely-circulated stories to the contrary, the president did not dash off a copy aboard a train to Gettysburg. Lincoln carefully prepared his major speeches in advance; his steady, even script in every manuscript is consistent with a firm writing surface, not the notoriously bumpy Civil War-era trains. Additional versions of the speech appeared in newspapers of the era, feeding modern-day confusion about the authoritative text.



Bliss Copy


Ever since Lincoln wrote it in 1864, this version has been the most often reproduced, notably on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. It is named after Colonel Alexander Bliss, stepson of historian George Bancroft. Bancroft asked President Lincoln for a copy to use as a fundraiser for soldiers (see "Bancroft Copy" below). However, because Lincoln wrote on both sides of the paper, the speech could not be reprinted, so Lincoln made another copy at Bliss's request. It is the last known copy written by Lincoln and the only one signed and dated by him. Today it is on display at the Lincoln Room of the White House.


Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.


Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.


But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


Abraham Lincoln

November 19, 1863



Nicolay Copy

Named for John G. Nicolay, President Lincoln's personal secretary, this is considered the "first draft" of the speech, begun in Washington on White house stationery. The second page is writen on different paper stock, indicating it was finished in Gettysburg before the cemetery dedication began. Lincoln gave this draft to Nicolay, who went to Gettysburg with Lincoln and witnessed the speech. The Library of Congress owns this manuscript.


Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.


Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do.


But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate we can not consecrate we can not hallow, this ground The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.


It is rather for us, the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us that, from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here, gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve these dead shall not have died in vain; that the nation, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


Hay Copy

Believed to be the second draft of the speech, President Lincoln gave this copy to John Hay, a White House assistant. Hay accompanied Lincoln to Gettysburg and briefly referred to the speech in his diary: "the President, in a fine, free way, with more grace than is his wont, said his half dozen words of consecration." The Hay copy, which includes Lincoln's handwritten changes, also is owned by the Library of Congress.


Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.


Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met here on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.


But in a larger sense, we can not dedicate we can not consecrate we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here, but can never forget what they did here.


It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they have, thus far, so nobly carried on. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


Everett Copy

Edward Everett, the chief speaker at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication, clearly admired Lincoln's remarks and wrote to him the next day saying, "I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes." In 1864 Everett asked Lincoln for a copy of the speech to benefit Union soldiers, making it the third manuscript copy. Eventually the state of Illinois acquired it, where it's preserved at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.


Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.


Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives, that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.


But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.


It is for us, the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here, have, thus far, so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


Bancroft Copy

As noted above, historian George Bancroft asked President Lincoln for a copy to use as a fundraiser for soldiers. When Lincoln sent his copy on February 29, 1864, he used both sides of the paper, rendering the manuscript useless for lithographic engraving. So Bancroft kept this copy and Lincoln had to produce an additional one (Bliss Copy). The Bancroft copy is now owned by Cornell University.


Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.


Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives, that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.


But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion - that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


Source for all versions: Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, edited by Roy P. Basler and others.


Related Links


A Teacher's Tour of the Battle of Gettysburg (Matthew Pinsker/Gilder Lehrman Institute)

Battlefield Maps (Library of Congress)

Civil War Institute (Gettysburg College)

Edward Everett's Gettysburg Speech (University of Maryland)

Gettysburg Address Exhibit (Library of Congress)

Gettysburg Address Eyewitness (National Public Radio)

Gettysburg Address News Article (New York Times)

Gettysburg Address Teacher Resource (C-SPAN)

Gettysburg Address Text

Gettysburg Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress)

Gettysburg Discussion Group (Bob & Dennis Lawrence)

Gettysburg Foundation

Gettysburg National Military Park (NPS)

How Some Few "Remarks" Became the Gettysburg Address (LAP/ALI)

David Wills's Letter of Invitation to Lincoln (Library of Congress)

Lincoln and the Gettysburg Awakening (JALA)

Lincoln and Gettysburg Timeline

Lincoln Fellowship of Pennsylvania

Lincoln's Invitation to Stay Overnight (Library of Congress)

Edward Everett's Letter to Lincoln (Library of Congress)

Photograph of Lincoln at Gettysburg (Library of Congress)

Reading of the Gettysburg Address (NPR)

Recollections of Lincoln at Gettysburg (Bob Cooke)

Response to a Serenade

Robert Todd Lincoln's "Gettysburg Story" (JALA)

Seminary Ridge Museum

Solving the Mysteries of the Gettysburg Address (LAP/ALI)

The Gettysburg Powerpoint Presentation (Peter Norvig)

Who Stole the Gettysburg Address? (JALA)

Wills House


Related Books


Boritt, Gabor. The Gettysburg Gospel: The Lincoln Speech That Nobody Knows. Simon & Schuster, 2006.

Graham, Kent. November: Lincoln's Elegy at Gettysburg. Indiana University Press, 2001.

Hoch, Bradley R. and Boritt, Gabor S. The Lincoln Trail in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania State University Press, 2001.

Johnson, Martin P. Writing the Gettysburg Address. University Press of Kansas, 2013.

Kunhardt, Philip B., Jr. A New Birth of Freedom - Lincoln at Gettysburg. Boston: Little, Brown, 1983.

Mearns, David C., Dunlap, Lloyd A., Wilson, Douglas L., and Sellers, John R., contributors. Long Remembered: Lincoln and His Five Versions of the Gettysburg Address. Levenger Press, 2011.

Wills, Garry. Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America. Touchstone Books, 1993.

Wilson, Douglas L. Lincoln's Sword: The Presidency and the Power of Words. Alfred A. Knopf, 2006

Home | News | Education | Timelines | Places | Resources | Books | Speeches | Index | Search

Lincoln speech text is in the public domain; the organization, remaining text, and photo on this page are copyright 2018 Abraham Lincoln Online. All rights reserved. Privacy Policyibson Go Away is a song Chyna shared with Fletcher in the episode "bad romANTs" to try and think of ways to get rid of Gibson, who had been hanging out with them way too much and was getting on their nerves.

Lyrics:

Our friend Gibson was feeling down,
Crying all day like a sad little clown,
Been playing games with him for a week
What can we do with this fuzzy haired freak?
We can take him on a trip to Albuquerque
Dehydrate his skin and make Gibson jerky
Give him a ride on a merry-go-round
Or dress him like a dog and take him to the pound
Go for a stroll on some country roads
Or feed him fatty foods 'til his heart explodes
Take him on a tour to South of France
Or stuff a hungry squirrel down his pants.

Trivia:

  • This song is one of 3 songs that have a character name in the song tittle. The two others are Olive's Rap, and Hey, New Kid.
  • This song is making fun of Gibson, but they all still like him. They called him a 'freak' and said it would be mean to the squirrel to shove a squirrel down his pants....to the squirrel. 
  • This song was a part of the episode bad RomANTs
  • This song was not on The A.N.T. Farm Soundtrack due to it being too short and a minor song, though some think it should have been because of it's hiliarity.

Gallery:                                           

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